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National Fraud Authority

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The National Fraud Authority (NFA) was an executive agency of the United Kingdom Home Office responsible for increasing protection for the UK economy from the harm caused by fraud. The NFA worked with a wide range of partners with the aim of making fraud more difficult to commit in the UK.
Formerly the National Strategic Fraud Authority, it was set up in October 2008 in response to the government's Fraud Review in 2006. It concluded that fraud was a significantly under-reported crime, and while various agencies and organisations were attempting to tackle the issue, greater co-operation was needed to achieve a real impact within the public sector. The scale of the problem pointed to the need to bring together the numerous counter-fraud initiatives that existed, which is when the NFA was formed.
The Chief Executive was Stephen Harrison.
The Home Secretary Theresa May announced in December 2013 that the NFA would be closed on 31 March 2014. Strategic development and threat analysis was transferred to the National Crime Agency, Action Fraud was transferred to the City of London Police, the e-confidence campaign transferred to the Home Office and responsibility for the development of the Counter-fraud Checking Service was taken on by the Cabinet Office.

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National Fraud Authority

The National Fraud Authority (NFA) was an executive agency of the United Kingdom Home Office responsible for increasing protection for the UK economy from the harm caused by fraud. The NFA worked with a wide range of partners with the aim of making fraud more difficult to commit in the UK. Formerly the National Strategic Fraud Authority, it was set up in October 2008 in response to the government's Fraud Review in 2006. It concluded that fraud was a significantly under-reported crime, and while various agencies and organisations were attempting to tackle the issue, greater co-operation was needed to achieve a real impact within the public sector. The scale of the problem pointed to the need to bring together the numerous counter-fraud initiatives that existed, which is when the NFA was formed. The Chief Executive was Stephen Harrison. The Home Secretary Theresa May announced in December 2013 that the NFA would be closed on 31 March 2014. Strategic development and threat analysis was transferred to the National Crime Agency, Action Fraud was transferred to the City of London Police, the e-confidence campaign transferred to the Home Office and responsibility for the development of the Counter-fraud Checking Service was taken on by the Cabinet Office.
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